Thursday, March 9, 2017

4 Legumes you want to have in your ayurvedic pantry.


In most cultures around the world, there is a combination of one legume and grain to produce an easily digested protein. In South America, corn and black beans had being a humble diet to a large population. In India the science of making soups, and dishes using dhals, lentils and beans, had being the based for the science of Ayurveda to balance each dosha, to nourish them, and to purify them.

Lets overview 4 different lentils, dhals and being that can make a difference in the way you understand cooking for each dosha.

1.-Red lentil: Massor dal
Ayurveda energetics:
  • Rasa (taste): sweet, astringent
  • Virya (action): cooling
  • Vipaka (post-digestive effect): sweet
  • Doshas (constitutions): Balancing for all doshas, may aggravate vata in excess.



Masoor dal is a small, brown-skinned lentil packed full of iron, protein, and trace minerals. To make digestion easier, the lentil has been split, and the outer skin has been carefully removed, revealing the bright red interior. Red lentils cook quickly and thoroughly, which makes them easy to prepare, and nourishing to the body without taxing the digestive system. The soft, light, and incredibly nutritious qualities of this dal make it a good choice for supporting all three doshas, all year-round.



2.- Urad dal:
Ayurvedic energetics:
  • Rasa (taste): sweet
  • Virya (action): heating
  • Vipaka (post-digestive effect): sweet
Doshas (constitutions): Balancing for vata, may aggravate pitta and kapha in excess.




Urad dal is a small black bean, similar to a lentil, that has been split and hulled with the outer black skin removed for quicker cooking and easier digestion. Urad dal has served as a staple in Indian cuisine for thousands of years and serves as an integral ingredient in the popular dish, dal makhani. This protein-packed legume is commonly served as a soup and paired with rice or flatbread, or ground into a flour and used as the base of a savory batter. Once cooked, urad dal becomes slightly heavy and unctuous, which makes this food especially grounding and nourishing for vata dosha. The dal itself is subtly sweet, inherently warming, and highly nutritious and combines well with a variety of grains to support healthy bone and muscle tissues. Prepare urad dal with your favorite herbs, spices, and vegetables for a nutritious addition to your Ayurvedic diet.



3.- Toor dal: Pigeon pea
Ayurveda energetics:
  • Rasa (taste): astringent, sweet
  • Virya (action): heating
  • Vipaka (post-digestive effect): pungent
Doshas (constitutions): Balancing for vata and kapha, may aggravate pitta in excess.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Toor dal has a rich history in Ayurvedic cooking, with its use dating back more than 3,000 years. A popular legume, Toor dal is also commonly called pigeon pea, and it is now widely used in culinary traditions throughout Asia, Africa, and South America. Toor dal has a deliciously nutty flavor that is sweet, slightly astringent, and pairs beautifully with basmati rice for a simple, well-rounded meal. Experiment with this yellow split pea in kitchari variations, as the base of a soup, or mixed into a rice pilaf. The warming qualities of toor dal make it most ideal for balancing vata and kapha, especially when prepared with digestive spices.

 

4.- Yellow mung dal.
Ayurvedic Energetics:
  • Rasa (taste): sweet, astringent
  • Virya (action): cooling
  • Vipaka (post-digestive effect): sweet
  • Doshas (constitutions): Balancing for all doshas.





Yellow mung dal is made from whole mung beans that have been hulled and split, resulting in a delicate lentil-like legume that is quick to cook and easy to digest. It is high in dietary fiber and an excellent source of protein, making this a healthy choice for vegans, vegetarians, and omnivores alike. When combined with our basmati rice and spices for each dosha, you will have a meal that can sustain, purify and nourish you in a simple way.


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